Translocation of Indian Bison – Conserving Biodiversity and Food Pyramid

As we all know, tiger is at the top of the food pyramid, and tiger conservation cannot be done without conserving that food pyramid, which itself entails conserving the biodiversity of an ecosystem. Loss of green cover depletes the herbivores and depletion of the herbivores leaves the tiger hungry, real hungry! What a condition for the poor jungle king to be in? But, there is hope and some action. Acclaimed wildlife conservationists from all over the world recently got together and made a historical effort in the jungles of Madhya Pradesh – central India.

We bring our readers a special report on the Historic Reintroduction of the Indian Bison (Translocation from Kanha to the Bandhavgarh National Park). Read the full report published here with the kind permission of the author, Rakesh Shukla. An abridged version of this report first appeared in the print edition of Central Chronicle of Bhopal.

A Pledge for Wildlife Conservation

Redeeming Our Pledge for Wildlife Conservation, was originally published in the print edition of Central Chronicle of Bhopal on September 30, 2010. Read the full article reproduced here at SaveTigers.com, with the author Dr. Rakesh Shukla’s permission.

Dr. Rakesh Shukla is a wildlife research officer in the Madhya Pradesh Forest Department and is currently based in Kanha Tiger Reserve. He is a winner of the ABN-AMRO Sanctuary award.

The royal splendour of a Tiger at Kanha National Park. Photo by Sudhir Mishra, FRO.
Are we gonna give this royal splendour a chance to survive? A Tiger at Kanha National Park, photographed by Sudhir Mishra, FRO.

Save Tigers Contest

Okay folks! We all know, we need to save tigers – that’s why you are at this website. We hope all of you have now become aware of the various things you can do to save tigers. Many of you may also be having some more ideas. Most of you comment that the numbers are down and we got to save tigers – but, we all already know that. Right!

So, let’s stop wasting time and get productive. Don your thinking caps and let the creative juices flow. Got an idea, or a strategy? Shoot it across. Got some data and analysis – share it.

We are rewarding the best entries with:
1 book on tiger conservation;
10 t-shirts;
100 caps.

That’s 111 prizes to be won! Send in as many entries as you can think and create. Use the contact-us page to send your entries and remember to join our mailing list to get updates on this and other contests.

The entries will be judged by a panel of eminent persons and authorities related to wildlife and tiger conservation.

Please note that the ideas should be legal, non-destructive, reasonable, practical and agreeable to all stakeholders right from the forest denizens (including our dear Tiger) to the world community.

This contest open until September 30, 2010. Winners will be announced during wildlife week starting October 2, 2010.

Save Trees to Save Tigers

Let the trees flourish and tigers will save themselves.

We read somewhere in the news that an educational institution spent INR 100,000 (around US$ 2,275) to adopt a tiger in a zoo for an year. First of all, a zoo is a very wrong place for a tiger to be in. Secondly, a zoo has funds allocated already to take care of the national animal.

We would rather this amount was spent on adopting trees in the villages. Each student of that school could have adopted a tree. You could adopt a tree and then look after it like your own child. Form a group and go to villages and forest fringe areas to educate people about saving nature to save tigers. Motivate the village folks, especially children for adopting trees in partnership with your group. Your group could provide moral support and other incentives to that person or child on the spot, who will actually save the tree.

You know, if you or your group have sufficient resources, you could even buy a piece of land and setup a plantation in partnership with the local folks. Why we are stressing partnership with local folks is that they are the ones who will ensure protection to the trees. Saving the trees will in turn save tigers.

Humans are more important than birds?

On a tour to the wildlife sanctuary at Kolleru lake in Andhra Pradesh, the union minister for environment and forests of India stated (source: The Hindu newspaper of 28 February, 2010) – “I don’t see the problem from the environment angle alone. Humans are more important than birds.”

The issue at stake is the reduction of the size of the wildlife sanctuary from present plus 5 contours to plus 3 contours.

Two local members of parliament and even the state government are reported to be pitching for this reduction in wildlife habitat. Pitiful situation indeed!

A final decision would be taken by the central government after a 5-member expert committee submits a report in about 3 months.

Thankfully, the minister recalled that the former chief minister of the state had sought a solution acceptable to all stakeholders.

The Kolleru wildlife sanctuary is a critically important avian habitat and stopover on India’s east coast between Chilika lake up north and Pulicat lake down south.